Thursday, March 31, 2011

Booking Through Thursday: Cereal (and other Odd Reads)


This week's question from Booking Through Thursday is: What’s the oddest thing you’ve ever read? (You know, something NOT a book, magazine, short story, poem or article.)


I had to think about this one because I don't consider anything "odd" reading.  I've read everything from road signs to soup cans.  It's just a matter of how bored I am.  I'll even read the dumb little politcal and religious tracts that come attached to/written on the rebates and other marketing mail I process at work if I'm bored enough.  Occasionally, they're good for a laugh. 

I think the strangest thing I've read - meaning it was a weird thing to post or publish - was a Craigslist ad from a guy who was looking for a Rabbi versed in "dark Kabbalistic rites" to help him create some type of magical creature.  I don't remember the details, just that the ad was good for one of those head-scratching "WTF?!?" chuckles.  I'm still not sure if the guy was serious or if it was meant as a joke.  I hope he was joking, but considering some of the odd things I've seen people send through the mail, I'm afraid he wasn't.  Eek!


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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Micro Musings: The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Audio CD
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (October 17, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0743564413
ISBN-13: 978-0743564410

The Muse Reviews Rating: 2 Laurels

Publisher's Description:
The quintessential novel of the Lost Generation, The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway's masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway's most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. The story follows the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love, and vanishing illusions. First published in 1926, The Sun Also Rises helped to establish Hemingway as one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century.


In The Sun Also Rises, a group of Americans and British ex-patriots spend most of their time getting drunk in Parisian cafes, attending bull fights in Spain and swapping sex partners faster than they change underwear.  Unless you're required to read The Sun Also Rises for a class, skip the novel and spend a couple of hours skimming the Cliffs Notes.  If it's required reading, borrow the audio book version from the library and listen while you're doing housework or putting in an hour at the gym.  You'll need the physical activity to keep you awake for this exercise in tedium.






Items described on The Muse Reviews may have been provided free of charge in exchange for an impartial review. Please refer to the Disclaimer for details.

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Micro Musings: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstooy

Paperback: 1008 pages
Publisher: Bantam Classics (June 1, 1984)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0553213466
ISBN-13: 978-0553213461

The Muse Reviews Rating: 2 Laurels

Publisher's Description:
A magnificent drama of vengeance, infidelity, and retribution, Anna Karenina portrays the moving story of people whose emotions conflict with the dominant social mores of their time. Sensual, rebellious Anna falls deeply and passionately in love with the handsome Count Vronsky. When she refuses to conduct the discreet affair that her cold, ambitious husband (and Russian high society) would condone, she is doomed. Set against the tragic love of Anna and Vronsky, the plight of the melancholy nobleman Konstantine Levin unfolds. In doubt about the meaning of life, haunted by thoughts of suicide, Levin's struggles echo Tolstoy's own spiritual crisis. But Anna's inner turmoil mirrors the own emotional imprisonment and mental disintegration of a woman who dares to transgress the strictures of a patriarchal world. In Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy brought to perfection the novel of social realism and created a masterpiece that bared the Russian soul.

In Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy waxes pastoral amid scenes of insipid women pining over egotistical, lack-witted men. Second only to Tolstoy's previous novel, War and Peace, in length, Anna Karenina is just as dull. This book is great for killing time at the gym or curing insomnia.



Items described on The Muse Reviews may have been provided free of charge in exchange for an impartial review. Please refer to the Disclaimer for details.